Thursday, 22 September 2011

Student Days

The Sixties Bloody Eve
Birthed War: We Cried for Peace and
A Bright Alaskan Light Was Killed
On Tessler’s Chariot Line.

Soldiers Marched in Montreal
As Bombs and Curfew Reigned, and
Psychedelic Experience Turned To
A Young Confusion High

But No Matter How I Rage
There’s No Turn’in Back The Page
And There’s No Coffee Brew’n
Underneath The Ghetto.

Across Drifted Cars Down Sherbrooke
We Skied to Drummond’s Bars
To Drink, and Play and Sing
Those Irish Lancer Tunes

Israel, She Came Dancing,
Her Hashish Smoked Our Minds;
We Jammed Until Our Fingers Bled,
While She Traded Souls in Kind.

But No Matter How I Rage
There’s No Turn’in Back the Page
And There’s No Coffee Brew’n
Underneath The Ghetto.

Fredericka’s Trial Is Over,
She Pines For Love No More; and Oh
What Hearts Were Torn When
Graceful Russia Knocked Our Door?

Friends Parted, Sad, Stone-Hearted,
Choosing Paths Which Each Believed In;
Perhaps From This Delusion
Some Joy May Come Some Day.

But No Matter How I Rage
There’s No Turn’in Back the Page
And There’s No Coffee Brew’n
Underneath the Ghetto.

Bryan Douglas Cook Spring 2010

Context for Student Days
A poem of memories from the author’s student days at McGill University from 1967 to 1971. The Chariot line refers to the suspicious “death” of a professor in Alaska immortalized in the book the “Firecracker Boys”. “Russia” is the author’s future bride Tatiana Marokin. Parting friends and many of the experiences were shared with Don “Paul” Prozetsky.

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